mryuzyorker:

  • Memory MONDAY
  • Take Me Back TUESDAY
  • Wayback WEDNESDAY
  • Throwback THURSDAY
  • Flashback FRIDAY
  • Send Me Back SATURDAY
  • So Far Behind SUNDAY

Pagbigyan! Maipilit lang ‘yang mukha mong kahapon lang kinuha pero  pang-paleolithic.

Reblogged from
Reblogged from Rosy Retrospection

DOTA

tawag ng mga British na Tatay sa Anak na Babae

Tags: joke haha

ANG TAO KAPAG MAY PROBLEMA:

yamzkieeers:

NAGSA-SOUND TRIP NA LANG

image

SINASAKTAN ANG SARILI

image

NANANAKIT NG IBA

image

NAGKUKULONG =)

image

NAG-IISIP NG SOLUSYON

image

NALOLOKA

image

NG NALOLOKA

image

NG NALOLOKA PA

image

ITINUTULOG NA LANG

image

NANANAKIT NG DINGDING

image

NAGYOYOGA

image

WALA SA SARILI KAPAG NASA KALSADA

image

NAG UUMEMOTE

image

NANINIRA NG GAMIT

image

PILIT TUMATAKAS

image

NAPOPOSSESS

image

NATUTULUYAN

image

SAN KA DIYAN?

Reblogged from Yam Yam
Reblogged from Rosy Retrospection
Reblogged from Rosy Retrospection

theurbankapampangan:

A French writer, J. Mallat, wrote in his book ‘Les Philippines; histoire, géographie, moeurs, agriculture, industrie et commerce des colonies espagnoles dans l’Océanie (1846)’ described the province of Pampanga as the richest and most beautiful in the Philippines, thus, has been dubbed as ‘New Castille’.

yamino:

Frozen 2: Elsa and Anna have a cute snowball fight for an hour and a half

kateordie:

disneyanimation:

Watch the entire “Let It Go” scene from Frozen featuring Idina Menzel performing as Elsa.

If you don’t wanna go see Frozen, this is the best 3:39 of the movie (except the short that plays beforehand). What a jam.

Reblogged from That's rough, buddy.
indiohistorian:

When Bonifacio was born, there was nothing spectacular about him, save that what he would eventually do for his people he lovingly called Haring Bayang Katagalugan. Through the years, he has been used as a propaganda of Marxism, a political tool by Quezon against Aguinaldo, a hero who would be pitted against another hero, Jose Rizal. But remove all these embellishments, and we have a man who was as normal and commonfolk as we all are and could be. His idea of progress encapsulated in the Tagalog word “ginhawa” still reverberates in our national consciousness.
We now know that he was not that poor as proletariat (Mabini was poorer than him), he was not that impatient and impulsive as portrayed in many monuments (the screaming Bonifacio stereotype), that to say that he was from Tondo doesn’t mean he was a goon or a political warlord, but simply lived in one of the most exciting economic quarter in the Spanish province of Manila that is, as a presenter in the Bonifacio 150 conference at UP would say, a hotbed for new and radical ideas. We know from historical records that his tactics in Manila (countering the accusations of the Magdalo faction that he was not a good strategist), although foiled, was still ingenious given that he was managing troops larger than that of Cavite. We also know that although he did not finish school, he was an avid reader, who read Victor Hugo, the biographies of American presidents, who was a fan of the ideas of Rizal embedded in the two Rizalian novels of Noli Me Tangere and El Filibusterismo. It is safe to say that in the context of the entire Asian region, the idea that a colonized man, an indio can rise up and govern his country without the strength of world superpowers was not only inspired by Rizal—it was revolutionary in Asia at the time. He established a nationwide movement of Filipino revolutionaries he called KKK or Kataastaasang Kagalanggalangang Katipunan ng mga Anak ng Bayan, the first group of that nature in Asia.
Bonifacio’s death is still an issue of controversy, and that his death brought about by his fellow revolutionaries in Cavite only proves that the problems of the ‘social cancer’ written by Rizal is still true, and that even in the injustice done to him, the Filipino people still applauds him louder than Aguinaldo.
Gregoria de Jesus, who searched the mountains to look for his body, and Artemio Ricarte, including Macario Sakay, who continued his legacy even after the Biak-na-Bato pact. Only a heart like Bonifacio could set ablaze hearts like these heroics.
We honor the man, for who he really is. He believed that freedom, even if it is at a high cost, can be sought and achieved, despite the depravity of his nation. It is to this that tearfully, this historian acknowledge the giant that was Andres.  “Aling pag-ibig ang hihigit kaya, sa pagkadalisay at pagkadakila… sa pag-ibig sa tinubuang lupa. Wala na nga. Wala.”
Salud, Supremo! Maligayang ika-150ng kaarawan! The first president of the Filipino nation.
*The Andres Bonifacio bust by the great Filipino sculptor Guillermo Tolentino. Take note of Bonifacio’s name in Baybayin below the bust. 

Maligayang Kaarawan, Supremo! :D

indiohistorian:

When Bonifacio was born, there was nothing spectacular about him, save that what he would eventually do for his people he lovingly called Haring Bayang Katagalugan. Through the years, he has been used as a propaganda of Marxism, a political tool by Quezon against Aguinaldo, a hero who would be pitted against another hero, Jose Rizal. But remove all these embellishments, and we have a man who was as normal and commonfolk as we all are and could be. His idea of progress encapsulated in the Tagalog word “ginhawa” still reverberates in our national consciousness.

We now know that he was not that poor as proletariat (Mabini was poorer than him), he was not that impatient and impulsive as portrayed in many monuments (the screaming Bonifacio stereotype), that to say that he was from Tondo doesn’t mean he was a goon or a political warlord, but simply lived in one of the most exciting economic quarter in the Spanish province of Manila that is, as a presenter in the Bonifacio 150 conference at UP would say, a hotbed for new and radical ideas. We know from historical records that his tactics in Manila (countering the accusations of the Magdalo faction that he was not a good strategist), although foiled, was still ingenious given that he was managing troops larger than that of Cavite. We also know that although he did not finish school, he was an avid reader, who read Victor Hugo, the biographies of American presidents, who was a fan of the ideas of Rizal embedded in the two Rizalian novels of Noli Me Tangere and El Filibusterismo. It is safe to say that in the context of the entire Asian region, the idea that a colonized man, an indio can rise up and govern his country without the strength of world superpowers was not only inspired by Rizal—it was revolutionary in Asia at the time. He established a nationwide movement of Filipino revolutionaries he called KKK or Kataastaasang Kagalanggalangang Katipunan ng mga Anak ng Bayan, the first group of that nature in Asia.

Bonifacio’s death is still an issue of controversy, and that his death brought about by his fellow revolutionaries in Cavite only proves that the problems of the ‘social cancer’ written by Rizal is still true, and that even in the injustice done to him, the Filipino people still applauds him louder than Aguinaldo.

Gregoria de Jesus, who searched the mountains to look for his body, and Artemio Ricarte, including Macario Sakay, who continued his legacy even after the Biak-na-Bato pact. Only a heart like Bonifacio could set ablaze hearts like these heroics.

We honor the man, for who he really is. He believed that freedom, even if it is at a high cost, can be sought and achieved, despite the depravity of his nation. It is to this that tearfully, this historian acknowledge the giant that was Andres.

“Aling pag-ibig ang hihigit kaya, sa pagkadalisay at pagkadakila… sa pag-ibig sa tinubuang lupa. Wala na nga. Wala.”

Salud, Supremo! Maligayang ika-150ng kaarawan! The first president of the Filipino nation.

*The Andres Bonifacio bust by the great Filipino sculptor Guillermo Tolentino. Take note of Bonifacio’s name in Baybayin below the bust.

Maligayang Kaarawan, Supremo! :D